zzxi | Food: drinks (5)

sayings_kwibus

#5 Food: drinks

In this column: bottle it up and go, beer bucket, bourbon, sloppy drunk

BOTTLE IT UP AND GO

"May be old, may be gray
You ain't too old just to shift them gears
You gotta bottle up and go"

Leave, make a change, stop talking (or drinking) and hit the road.

Bottle up and go

Bottle it up and go - John Lee Hooker

BUCKET

“My bucket's got a hole in it, won't buy no beer”, Washboard Sam.

"I went walkin' right down the street, two good-lookin' girls I had a chance to meet
One had a bucket, the other one had a dime, "come on boys let's have a good time", Whistler And His Jug Band (Foldin' bed)

My bucket's got a hole in it - Wasboard Sam (with 1930s photo's slider)

Beer buckets; a boy carries beer buckets to the factories during lunch
The act of sending someone out to purchase beer in a growler came to be known as "rush the growler (or can)"—the verb rush, implying a sense of speediness.

ONE BOURBON ONE SCOTCH ONE BEER

Bourbon

Sloppy drunk blues - John Lee "Sonny Boy" Williamson

Sources: Talkin' to myself: Blues lyrics, Michael Taft, digitalcitizen.ca, federalcigarjugband.com, pancocojams.blogspot.nl, americanbluesscene.com, YouTube, Wikipedia, Hudson Motors Compagny, Archive Minneapolis, The Cruel Plains, M.H.Price a.o., truewestmagazine.com, The Austin Chronicle, Cambridge Free English Dictionary, Oxford Dictionary, TheSaurus.com, dragonjazz.com/grablue/blues_travel, Encyclopedia of African American Popular Culture, Blues by Paul Breman, Blues by David Harrison, Quora.com, urbandictionary.com, Blogs.loc.gov, The Ballad Hunter by Alan Lomax, Black Pearls: Blues Queens of the 1920th by Daphne Duval Harrison, jopiepopie.blogspot.nl, redhotjazz.com, The Blues Lyrics Formula by Michael Taft, American Ballads and Folk Songs by Alan Lomax and John Avery Lomax, The Past Is Not Dead: Essays from the  Southern Quarterly by Douglas B. Chambers, EarlyBlues.com, railroad-line.com,  Jason Lee Davis' RailFan Pages , centertruthjustice.org

zzxj | Food: drinks (4)

sayings_kwibus

#4 Food: drinks

In this column: moonshine, corn, white lightning

MOONSIDE

Moonshine, also known as "hooch" (a name borrowed from the Hoochinoo tribe of Alaska, known for its potent homemade brew) or "homebrew," is made by fermenting a sugar source to produce ethanol. Traditionally, moonshine is made from a mash of corn and sugar. The alcohol is separated from the mash by a distillation process.
One big difference between moonshine and other liquors like whiskey or bourbon is that moonshine is not aged. The result is a distilled spirit that contains a high percentage of alcohol, many times greater than 100 proof (50%), like a white whiskey.
The term comes from the fact that it is done at night so people will not see the smoke from the still. Therefore, it can be hidden from the police or thirsty neighbors.
Moonshine was originally packaged in clay jugs, then later mason jars. The old clay jars were often marked with "XXX" on the side. Supposedly each "X" represented how many times the brew had been through the distillation process.

Moonshine

Moonshine - Sonny Boy Williamson II

CORN

Bootleg liquor made from fermenting corn.

Corn Liquor Blues - Lewis Black

WARNING

The distilling process itself produces alcohol vapors, which are highly flammable.
Moonshine can be contaminated with methanol, because methanol vaporizes at a lower temperature than alcohol. The first liquid can contain methanol. Methanol is highly poisonous and can cause blindness and even death.

WHITE LIGHTNING

  1. Very high proof moonshine. Borders on being 200 proof (actually 100% PURE ethyl alcohol); it's pure grain alcohol and is illegal.
  2. White lightning is any sort of illegal liquor, especially corn whiskey.
"Well I asked my old pappy why he called his brew, White lightning 'stead of mountain dew, I took a little sip and right away I knew, As my eyes bugged out and my face turned blue! Lightnin' started flashin' and thunder started crashin' Shhhoooh . . . white lightning!" - Song by George Jones 

White Lightnin' - Mississippi Fred McDowell

Sources: Talkin' to myself: Blues lyrics, Michael Taft, digitalcitizen.ca, federalcigarjugband.com, pancocojams.blogspot.nl, americanbluesscene.com, YouTube, Wikipedia, Hudson Motors Compagny, Archive Minneapolis, The Cruel Plains, M.H.Price a.o., truewestmagazine.com, The Austin Chronicle, Cambridge Free English Dictionary, Oxford Dictionary, TheSaurus.com, dragonjazz.com/grablue/blues_travel, Encyclopedia of African American Popular Culture, Blues by Paul Breman, Blues by David Harrison, Quora.com, urbandictionary.com, Blogs.loc.gov, The Ballad Hunter by Alan Lomax, Black Pearls: Blues Queens of the 1920th by Daphne Duval Harrison, jopiepopie.blogspot.nl, redhotjazz.com, The Blues Lyrics Formula by Michael Taft, American Ballads and Folk Songs by Alan Lomax and John Avery Lomax, The Past Is Not Dead: Essays from the  Southern Quarterly by Douglas B. Chambers, EarlyBlues.com, railroad-line.com,  Jason Lee Davis' RailFan Pages , centertruthjustice.org

zzxk | Food (3)

sayings_kwibus

#3 Food

In this column: kidney stew, grits ain't groceries, potatoes

KIDNEY STEW

Crazy about you baby, but I just ain't got the price
You're a high class mama, so I guess it ain't no dice
Goin' back home, and get my old gal Sue
She ain't the caviar kind, just plain old kidney stew
Old…

Kidney stew - Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson

GRITS AIN'T GROCERIES

Grits are a porridge made from boiled cornmeal. Also grits are girls raised in The South.
Groceries are items you buy in a grocer's shop.

Little Milton

Because you know I love you, baby
Ooh you know I love you baby, yeah
Now if I don't love you baby, I tell you
Grits ain't grocery, eggs ain't poultry
And Mona Lisa was a man

POTATOES

Potato is a well known vegetable. It has also a different meaning: in a slang potato is someone uninteresting, dull, strange, ugly or fat.
The explanation of "Diggin' my potatoes" is on this DoggoneBlues-page.

A man works hard then comes on home,
Expects to find stew with that fine ham bone.
He opens the door, then start to lookin',
Says, Woman, what's this stuff you're cookin'?
All that meat and no potatoes
Just ain't right, like green tomatoes.
Here I'm waiting, palpitating,
For all that meat and no potatoes.
I don’t think that peas are bad
With meat most anything goes
Yes, I look into the pot
I’m fit to fight
‘Cause, woman, you know that mess just ain’t right
All that meat and no potatoes

Diggin' my potatoes - Muddy Waters

Sources: Talkin' to myself: Blues lyrics, Michael Taft, digitalcitizen.ca, federalcigarjugband.com, pancocojams.blogspot.nl, americanbluesscene.com, YouTube, Wikipedia, Hudson Motors Compagny, Archive Minneapolis, The Cruel Plains, M.H.Price a.o., truewestmagazine.com, The Austin Chronicle, Cambridge Free English Dictionary, Oxford Dictionary, TheSaurus.com, dragonjazz.com/grablue/blues_travel, Encyclopedia of African American Popular Culture, Blues by Paul Breman, Blues by David Harrison, Quora.com, urbandictionary.com, Blogs.loc.gov, The Ballad Hunter by Alan Lomax, Black Pearls: Blues Queens of the 1920th by Daphne Duval Harrison, jopiepopie.blogspot.nl, redhotjazz.com, The Blues Lyrics Formula by Michael Taft, American Ballads and Folk Songs by Alan Lomax and John Avery Lomax, The Past Is Not Dead: Essays from the  Southern Quarterly by Douglas B. Chambers, EarlyBlues.com, railroad-line.com,  Jason Lee Davis' RailFan Pages , centertruthjustice.org

zzxl | Food (2)

sayings_kwibus

#2 Food in blues songs

In this column: jelly roll, squeeze my lemon, all that meat and no potatoes

JELLY ROLL

A jelly roll is a dessert made of sponge cake that has been spread with jam (or jam mixed with cream) and rolled up into a log, but this is the blues and that's not all it means!
Jelly roll is also one of many evocative culinary euphemisms for female genitals heard in the blues.

Jelly roll
“Jelly” was a popular nickname for bluesmen, especially smooth and flashy types such as pianist Jelly Roll Morton, bassist Jelly Williams, and guitarist Jelly Thompson.
Ferdinand Joseph La Menthe aka Jelly Roll Morton

Shake it don't break it - Charley Patton

Everybody have a jelly roll like mine, I lives in town
I, ain't got no brown, I, an' I want it now
My jelly, my roll, sweet mama, don't let it fall
You can snatch it, you can grab it, you can break it,
You can twist it, any way that I love to get it
I, had my right mind since I, I blowed this town
My jelly, my roll, sweet mama, don't let it fall

SQUEEZE MY LEMON

Old blues singer code for male masturbation.
The phrase "Squeeze (my lemon) till the juice runs down my leg" appears in Robert Johnson's 1937 song Traveling Riverside Blues". Johnson probably took the lyrics from Arthur McKay's song "She Squeezed My Lemon", recorded earlier that year.

Ham hocks and red beans

She Squeezed My Lemon - Art McKay

Traveling Riverside Blues - Robert Johnson

ALL THAT MEAT AND NO POTATOES

"All That Meat and No Potatoes" was a phrase used in the 1940s that described a big figured attractive woman with small breasts. Fats Waller liked a female vocalist he was working with, except that she was all that meat and no potatoes. So he wrote a song about it and expressing discontent with cooking that had a lot of meat and no potatoes, as a metaphor for Fats’ feelings towards this woman.

A man works hard then comes on home,
Expects to find stew with that fine ham bone.
He opens the door, then start to lookin',
Says, Woman, what's this stuff you're cookin'?
All that meat and no potatoes
Just ain't right, like green tomatoes.
Here I'm waiting, palpitating,
For all that meat and no potatoes.
I don’t think that peas are bad
With meat most anything goes
Yes, I look into the pot
I’m fit to fight
‘Cause, woman, you know that mess just ain’t right
All that meat and no potatoes

All That Meat and No Potatoes - Fats Waller

Sources: Talkin' to myself: Blues lyrics, Michael Taft, digitalcitizen.ca, federalcigarjugband.com, pancocojams.blogspot.nl, americanbluesscene.com, YouTube, Wikipedia, Hudson Motors Compagny, Archive Minneapolis, The Cruel Plains, M.H.Price a.o., truewestmagazine.com, The Austin Chronicle, Cambridge Free English Dictionary, Oxford Dictionary, TheSaurus.com, dragonjazz.com/grablue/blues_travel, Encyclopedia of African American Popular Culture, Blues by Paul Breman, Blues by David Harrison, Quora.com, urbandictionary.com, Blogs.loc.gov, The Ballad Hunter by Alan Lomax, Black Pearls: Blues Queens of the 1920th by Daphne Duval Harrison, jopiepopie.blogspot.nl, redhotjazz.com, The Blues Lyrics Formula by Michael Taft, American Ballads and Folk Songs by Alan Lomax and John Avery Lomax, The Past Is Not Dead: Essays from the  Southern Quarterly by Douglas B. Chambers, EarlyBlues.com, railroad-line.com,  Jason Lee Davis' RailFan Pages , centertruthjustice.org

zzxm | Soul food (1)

sayings_kwibus

In this column: soul food

SOUL FOOD

Soul food (aka downhome southern food) is often mentioned in blues lyrics. The menu includes dishes with: oxtails, neck bones, pigs' feet, ham hocks, chitterlings, ribs (pork and beef), fried chicken, catfish, several kinds of green, turnips, rutabagas, fried corn, fried green tomatoes, field peas, cobbler and cornbread.

Turnips, rutabagas and cornbread
Rutabagas, to the right turnips

CATFISH

The most commonly eaten species in the United States are the channel catfish and the blue catfish, both of which are common in the wild and increasingly widely farmed. In the United States it is eaten crumbed with cornmeal and fried.

Fried catfish

Sunnyland Slim at Delta Fish Market

HAM HOCKS

A ham hock (or hough) or pork knuckle is the joint between the tibia/fibula and the metatarsals of the foot of a pig, where the foot was attached to the hog's leg. It is the portion of the leg that is neither part of the ham proper nor the ankle or foot (trotter), but rather the extreme shank end of the leg bone.

Ham hocks and red beans

Hungry Country Girl - Otis Spann and Fleetwood Mac

COBBLER

A cobbler with peaches

NECK BONES

Neck bones are inexpensive and easy to cook. But don't be mistaken, this meat is packed with flavor and taste great. This slow-cooking meat and rice meal is a favorite of many families, both worked well on a tight budget.

Neck bones

CHITLINS (CHITTERLINGS)

Chitterlings (chitlins) are a culinary dish usually made from the large intestines of a hog.

Chitterlings (chitlins)

Mama, don't you think I know

Got a knock-kneed mama, down in Tennessee
She's short and squatty, she's all right with me
Now knock-kneed mama, what you going to cook tonight
What ever you cook, just cook it right
You got a face like a washboard and a mouth like a tub
Teach me mama, that washboard rub
Now some people say, chitlins are good to eat
I'll never eat chitlins, long as hog got feet
Takes a long-tailed monkey, a short-tailed dog
To do that dance, they cal the falling off the log
Now the monkey told the elephant, if he's not drunk
I know you're sober, you got the tail in front
Now the monkey told the elephant, you may be drinking wine
You can't switch your tail, like I switch mine

Papa Charlie Jackson, 1925

Chitlins Con Carne - Kenny Burtell

Chili Blues -Jon Meyerjon

Sourcesfederalcigarjugband.com, pancocojams.blogspot.nl, americanbluesscene.com, YouTube, Wikipedia, Hudson Motors Compagny, Archive Minneapolis, The Cruel Plains, M.H.Price a.o., truewestmagazine.com, The Austin Chronicle, Cambridge Free English Dictionary, Oxford Dictionary, TheSaurus.com, dragonjazz.com/grablue/blues_travel, Encyclopedia of African American Popular Culture, Blues by Paul Breman, Blues by David Harrison, Quora.com, urbandictionary.com, Blogs.loc.gov, The Ballad Hunter by Alan Lomax, Black Pearls: Blues Queens of the 1920th by Daphne Duval Harrison, jopiepopie.blogspot.nl, redhotjazz.com, The Blues Lyrics Formula by Michael Taft, American Ballads and Folk Songs by Alan Lomax and John Avery Lomax, The Past Is Not Dead: Essays from the  Southern Quarterly by Douglas B. Chambers, EarlyBlues.com, railroad-line.com,  Jason Lee Davis' RailFan Pages , centertruthjustice.org

zzxn | From neck to neck

Not that I have or have bought many guitars, but there was a time when I was looking for what was the best guitar for me. Anyway, a Fender. I found it difficult because they differed from each other on so many points. For example, it could happen that a guitar that felt good in the store, revealed itself very differently at home.
The neck was mainly a point that I had to take into account. That is why I had written down all kinds of neck profiles from fender brochures. To always have that piece of paper at hand, I kept it in my wallet. One morning (in 2019) I discovered that that piece of paper was still in my wallet and that I have been carrying it with me for 25 years.

I switch guitars every now and then. From the feeling. A guitar, which has been in the attic for years, can suddenly be very satisfying and give a lot of fun. This experience taught me not to trade in guitars anymore. Every guitar has its moment.
It is true that all my guitars have had a special treatment (with the luthiers Ferdinand Rikkers and Jacco Stuitje, Groningen) and thus became more playable for me.
Lately I have been playing on a Fender Squier 70s Reissue from 1983 (made in Japan, but with American parts) and that works well. I leave my 54s Reissue Strat (1995) on the stand for that. The 54-er originally has a rock maple neck with a V-profile and thin frets. I didn't like playing: the strings felt tight and stiff, the neck stiff. I had the neck replaced at Rikkers. I wanted one like the one on the Fender Squier. It also had a Godin Ibanez-like neck with a rosewood fretboard and jumbo frets. Quite different from the Squier, which I initially wanted, but I enjoyed playing on it for over 10 years. Which again shows that the factors that make a guitar enjoyable are not easy to determine.
Now the '54 -er is back in its original condition (only with jumbo frets) and with its blonde appearance a picture to behold.

In 2014 I used the 54-er for the Greyhound Blues Band CD. In 2017, a US Standard Telecaster was the favorite. I bought it for the Blues, Rhythm and Love CD (2007). I needed a Tele and it had a nice open sound. This guitar also disappeared in the attic for years, but after a facelift I performed with it from 2015 onwards. Although the guitar was bought as new in 2006, I later saw on the basis of the number N8 that it had already been produced in 1998. Incomprehensible that nobody wanted him in the meantime. Incidentally, the Tele has a C-profile with a compound radius.
I bought the Squier for 350 guilders in the 1990s. I already knew then that those first Japanese Fenders were well built. I also had a Japanese 57s Reissue Strat (JV00126)* with a large fender logo on the headstock, but I got rid of it, because someone had chopped the body for placing humbuckers. Because the Japanese Fenders were not expensive, they were treated lightly. My Squier is also quite damaged.

* JV Fender Squier

In 1982 the JV Fender Squiers were only intended for the Japanese market, but some containers were still shipped to England. I bought my JV in a guitar shop in Amsterdam, which only sold used guitars and given the low number that guitar is one of the first to reach Europe. The second series, the SQ guitars, were sold on the European market and were almost from the same time. They were rare in the American market, Canadian blues guitarist Jeff Healey was the lucky one to own one.

Neck radius

  • 7.25" (round)
  • 9.50"
  • 12.0" (more flat)
  • Compound: 9.5” – 12,5” (from round to flat)

Shape

  • Medium (like US vintage reissue)
  • D (early 50th, baseball neck)
  • V (later 50th)
  • Soft V (custom ’54)
  • Shallow U (standaard strat)
  • Special V (Clapton)
  • Special deep 50th (Beck)
  • Special U (special tele's, now baseball neck)
  • Oval (Vaughan, Cray)
  • C (custom 60th, sparkle tele)
  • Thick C (custom 60th)
  • Special oval (Burton tele)

Wide neck (nut)

  • A = 1  1/2"
  • B = 1  5/8” (normal)
  • C = 1  3/4"
  • D = 1  7/8”

Lots of technical information on: www.guitarhq.com/fender.html

zzxo | Trains (3)

sayings_kwibus

In this column: Cannonball Express, The Flying Crow and The Frisco

CANNONBALL

“I’m goin' down to the station, catch that west cannonball”.
Sunshine Blues -- Memphis Jug Band

The Cannonball is a fast passenger train, that refers to a crack train (fastest train between two points) on the Illinois Central Line. On April 30, 1900, John Luther "Casey" Jones and his fireman, Sim Webb, were driving the cannonball express down to Memphis when it wrecked, killing Casey and spawning numerous songs and a movie.

Jones and Webb on the Cannonball

Sunshine Blues -- Memphis Jug Band

Cannonball Express - Peggy Lee

THE FLYING CROW

"Now, The Flying Crow left Port Arthur, Texas babe – with a red, blue light behind."
Flying Crow Blues -- Dallas Jamboree Jug Band

The Flying Crow is a passenger train, a flagship of the Kansas City Southern Railway. The train was anchored in Kansas City and traversing to Houston. 

The Flying Crow

Flying Crow Blues -- Dallas Jamboree Jug Band

The Flying Crow in 1967, New Orleans Union Terminal

THE FRISCO

“I guess I'll have to catch the Frisco out, in this land.  Catch the Frisco out.”
Poor Boy, Long Ways From Home -- Gus Cannon (as Banjo Joe)

The Frisco train connects St. Louis and San Francisco.

Cape Girardeau, Missouri

Poor Boy, Long Ways From Home — Gus Cannon (as Banjo Joe)

Sourcesfederalcigarjugband.com, pancocojams.blogspot.nl, americanbluesscene.com, YouTube, Wikipedia, Hudson Motors Compagny, Archive Minneapolis, The Cruel Plains, M.H.Price a.o., truewestmagazine.com, The Austin Chronicle, Cambridge Free English Dictionary, Oxford Dictionary, TheSaurus.com, dragonjazz.com/grablue/blues_travel, Encyclopedia of African American Popular Culture, Blues by Paul Breman, Blues by David Harrison, Quora.com, urbandictionary.com, Blogs.loc.gov, The Ballad Hunter by Alan Lomax, Black Pearls: Blues Queens of the 1920th by Daphne Duval Harrison, jopiepopie.blogspot.nl, redhotjazz.com, The Blues Lyrics Formula by Michael Taft, American Ballads and Folk Songs by Alan Lomax and John Avery Lomax, The Past Is Not Dead: Essays from the  Southern Quarterly by Douglas B. Chambers, EarlyBlues.com, railroad-line.com,  Jason Lee Davis' RailFan Pages , centertruthjustice.org

zzxp | Voice exercises

Vocal cords are muscles

Treat them the same as the other muscles.
Find relaxation and exercise regularly (give them your attention every day).
Always warm up before a performance and cool down afterwards.

Relaxation

Keep your head straight.
Let your shoulders hang.
Relax. Legs slightly apart, your body must be able to bounce. Feet point outwards slightly. Like you are a weightlifter. This is your connection with the earth. Feel the ground on which you stand. This is the starting position.
Anytime your throat tightens and you put too much pressure on your vocal cords, return to this position. The connection with the earth that you feel helps you shift your attention downwards.

1. Breathing

Active exhalation with abdominal tension.
Passive inhalation. Sigh out first. Don't blow.
Do this on the S. Tongue forward, by the teeth (feel the air through your teeth).
Slow: SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS ue
Faster: SSSSS SSSSS SSSSS ue

Instructions

Think that your belly is an air balloon, which you deflate with stomach tension, with retraction. The airflow leaves your slightly opened mouth.
You don't have to do anything to inhale, that will happen automatically. The balloon fills up again on breath support. So do not actively put up your stomach.
ue = exhale
If you want to hear a sound when exhaling, grab a beer/soda bottle and sigh above the bottle opening, hold the bottle until you hear a tone. Don't blow.

2. Larynx position

Make swallow - yawn, swallow - yawn movements.
Do not raise your head while doing so.

You will have to master the swallow - yawn movement. The movement also resembles the onset of vomiting. You feel your larynx move.
Place your hand on your chest and place your middle finger in the dimple above your sternum. Extend the index finger towards your throat. When swallowing yawn, the Adam's apple moves up and down and hits your index finger. In this way you make the movement physical.

3. Voice exercise with the V and Z (voiced)

Make a deep humming sound with V / Z. Do this with great resistance through your teeth. Do not change the quality of the sound.

Loosely clench your teeth, open your lips.

4. Click with the vocal cords

Don't force the voice down.

On K; feel the vibration in the throat with your hand.

5. Voting practice on PUEUEUEUE HE and POOOOOO HE.

Blow over the vocals.

Sigh as if you are taking a breather after a hard job.
With PUEUE HE you go over the break in the register. You feel it in the larynx; from high to low.
Make sure you have a humming sound at HE again. Look that up.
If you've asked too much of your voice, you've lost that buzzing sound. Relax and exercise until it's back.

6. Voice exercise on FOO

Keep going back to the low base.

7. V / Z with air blasts

Keep going back to the low base.

8. V / Z with frequency change

Keep going back to the low base. Imitate a French police siren.
Put dynamics on the blue dot.

Warm up and cool down

You do exercises in the car on the way to and from the performance.
I always do no 1, 2, 3 and 5.
I always do No 5 on the day.
No 5 also helps me if I keep swallowing mucus or with a cough.
It is looking for relaxation in the voice muscles. With a low hum, the muscle can relax again.

Do's and don'ts

Do the warming up and cooling down often.
Look for peace and relaxation, look for it physically in your body. How am I ?! What is my stomach doing ?!
Drink lots of water.
Chewing gum is allowed, but preferably not gum with mint. Mint dissipates moisture.
Make sure you have a good monitor with an adjustment for the tone frequency and volume. The pressure, the SPL, must also be high: from 116 Db peak SPL - 128. I wanted a 12 "speaker, a tweeter and at least 200 watts with a high SPL.
The band plays forward over your monitor. Your vocals should be able to see through that. Also pay attention to this with a sound check. Do vocal exercises to check it: click with your vocal cords, foofoofffff.
Don't yell. Even if the audience thinks that blues should be sung with a voice soaked with whiskey and cigars. If blues is your passion, you want to enjoy it for as long as possible. Look for tricks that give your singing a conviction. Sing with a "fat tongue". Think of the story you want to tell with the lyrics of the song.
In blues the guitar is an important instrument and guitarists like to play in the key of A. That is a difficult key to be convincing in. You have the feeling that you cannot lash out well. My natural voice is much more suited to C and F. I first lowered my register on speech. Then the vocals followed.
In any case, it is better to sing and speak lower, because that requires less of your vocal cords.
Speak to the audience as little as possible during breaks. In a busy cafe with loud music you can easily damage your voice. If you do talk, put one hand over your mouth. You can then be heard better without raising your voice.

zzxq | Top That!

We are on vacation in South Dakota and it is late afternoon in the summer of 2012. The water surface reflects the last rays of a beautiful day. We float on a pontoon boat on the waves of Lake Poinsett. Our glasses are full and we enjoyed the snacks we brought with us. “Sing us song”. I grab my guitar and with full commitment sing "Hard Times" by Ray Charles. When the last chord dies out, someone shouts: “Top that!”. I am very satisfied with the song's presentation, but “Top that!”, What next song can go over that. The next song is “second best” and it feels that way.

Months later, the Americans are on a return visit. I bring up the Lake Poinsett event. The American is indignant: “You Europeans think you can speak English, You know nothing. He has given you the greatest compliments he can give. "Top that!" There is no one in the world who does it better than you! ”.

"Top that!"

zzxs | Chicago Bob Nelson

On Thursday, January 17, 2013 at the age of 69 Chicago Bob Nelson passed away. Bob was a harmonica player and singer and known for Louisiana and Chicago blues styles.
Bob was named "Chicago" because every blues venue in the Windy City where Muddy Waters played, Robert Lee (Bob) was also featured. Muddy came up with the stage name "Chicago Bob" and he has kept this name throughout his career.
Louisiana blues legends Slim Harpo and Lazy Lester encouraged him and taught him the rudiments of the blues harp. Bob cites Harpo, Lester, Sonny Boy Williamson II and Jimmy Reed as his main influences.

He traveled extensively to Chicago for family visits and spent much of his childhood there. In the early 60 years he moved to Chicago. There he met Howlin’ Wolf, Muddy Waters, Buddy Guy, Junior Wells and Earl Hooker. Later he played with Muddy Waters at the well-known Newport Folk Festival.
Bob Nelson has toured with Luther "Snake Boy" Johnson, Tinsley Ellis (The Heart Fixers) and John Lee Hooker.
Bob was born in 1944 in Bogalusa, Louisiana and now lives in Atlanta Georgia.
Bob leaves us a rich collection of beautiful recordings, such as the two albums he recorded in the 90 years for King Snake Records: Hit and Run Lover (1992) and Back to Bogalusa (1996). His latest CD Tell Me Mama (2009, Music Maker Relief Foundation) contains a collection of acoustic blues, which beautifully shows his talent.

In 1996 the Greyhound Blues Band toured Western Europe with Bob for a month. It was an unforgettable time for us and a good learning experience for our Doggone Blues. In one of the conversations with him that name came up.
We've always had the hope of performing with him again. It won’t happen again.

R.I.P. Bob.

On tour (Germany)
On tour (Netherlands)
On tour (France)
Bob stayed in Midlaren in the north of the Netherlands
Bob met Guitar Shorty in France

zzxu | JonMeyerjon and Band

Blues-Out

JON MEYERJON BAND

Een Blues-Out brengt een concert van eigen composities, een mix van verschillende muziekstijlen met altijd een verbinding naar de blues. In een Blues-Out wordt muziek met passie gespeeld, waarbij de muzikanten ieder vanuit hun eigen achtergrond hun creativiteit inbrengen.
Met aanstekelijke ritmes wordt een muzikaal verhaal verteld, dat uitnodigt om te bewegen.

 

 

BOEKEN

Boek een Blues-Out tegen een v o o r d e l i g KENNISMAKINGSTARIEF.

JON MEYERJON

Jon Meyerjon (zang en gitaar) komt 1991 in contact met Drentse Blues en is daarna bijna 30 jaar zanger-gitarist van de Asser Greyhound Blues Band. Met deze band treedt hij op in het bluescircuit en op festivals door heel Nederland en landen in Europa. Hij doet veel ervaring op bij het begeleiden van veel, vaak Amerikaanse, bluesmuzikanten. Zoals: Henry Gray, Aron Burton, Louisiana Red, James Harman, Chicago Bob Nelson, Gene Taylor, Tino Gonzales, Curtis Knight en Eb Davis.
Sinds 2018 volgt Jon een eigen blues-route “de Blues-Out”, waarmee hij meer aandacht en ruimte heeft om zijn eigen interpretaties en composities ten gehore te brengen.
Van Meyerjon zijn drie albums verschenen: The Doggoners Blues Out (2017), Blues Rhythm ‘n Love (2007) en Doggone It! (2001).

RENÉ VAN ASTENRODE

René van Astenrode is docent slagwerk op de muziekschool in Haren en de Kunstenschool Stadskanaal. Hij volgde zijn studie slagwerk van 1979 tot 1985 aan het Conservatorium te Groningen. Naast deze studie volgde hij een studie drums en vibrafoon in Den Haag en Amsterdam. Drums, percussie en vibrafoon speelt hij o.a. in zijn kwartet “Good Vibes”, waar eigen stukken en arrangementen worden gespeeld. Met diverse jazzformaties heeft hij in Frankrijk en Duitsland getoerd.

JOS BRUINING

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Jos Bruining heeft zich de afgelopen 35 jaar ontwikkeld tot een veelzijdig bassist en doceert zijn ruime ervaring op de Kunstenschool Stadskanaal. Jos heeft in diverse orkesten en ensembles gespeeld, variërend van classic jazz tot blues en van klassiek tot experimenteel. Hij speelde onder meer in het Westerwolds Jazz Kollektief (contrabas), het Politie Orkest Noord Nederland (contrabas en basgitaar) en gospelkoor 'Dabar' (basgitaar).

Live @ tKeerpunt Spijkerboor feat. Lars Müller

Live @ tKeerpunt Spijkerboor feat. Lars Müller

Live @ Sally O’Briens Zwolle feat. Lars Müller

JMj Band feat. Lars Müller (facebook-video PieDa)

Jon Meyerjon met Lars Müller

Foto Ivan Snijder

zzxv | Greyhound Blues Band

BAND
De Greyhound Blues Band bestaat sinds 1991 en is een zeer geroutineerde band.
De Drentse bluesband bestaat uit muzikanten die eerder in diverse bands als de Juke Joint Blues Band, Southside Blues Band en de John Stevens Band speelden en in deze formatie hun muzikale ervaringen gebundeld hebben. Hun voorkeur gaat uit naar blues, die zijn oorsprong vindt in Chicago en Texas.
Ook buiten Nederland is de Greyhound Blues Band met succes op de diverse bluespodia te vinden zoals in Duitsland, België, Frankrijk en Zwitserland. Naast de reguliere optredens wordt de band regelmatig ingezet als begeleidingsband van internationale bluesmuzikanten.

BEGELEIDINGSBAND van nationale en internationale bluesartiesten
De Greyhound Blues Band brengt ook revues met authentieke, Amerikaanse bluesartiesten en vooraanstaande nationale muzikanten. De band heeft hiermee gedurende hun meer dan 25-jarig bestaan veel ervaring mee opgedaan.
De bluesmuziek is geworteld in de Chicago Blues en wordt gespeeld met passie, die uitnodigt om te bewegen en mee te doen.
De band kent meerdere bezettingen. De vaste bezetting bestaat uit Martin van der Velde (bas) en George Snijder (drums).. Daar waar een hammondorgel nodig is, is Michiel Mens een vaste waarde.
De “Greyhoundbus” neemt je mee naar Chicago en voert je langs "downtown" bluesclubs en juke joints. De gerenommeerde muzikanten, die de revue passeren hebben alle hun sporen verdiend en brengen blues in zijn authentiekste vorm.

George Snijder (drums) Martin van der Velde (bas) feat. Robert Cotton
Michiel Mens

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