zzwu | Communication in blues

sayings_kwibus

Communication

In this column: hand signals and keywords for tempo and progressions

Archie Lee Hooker

In my career as a guitarist I have accompanied a lot of blues musicians/artists and there is never room to practice the songs together. Usually we prepare a set list before the concert or the artist calls out the songs while playing. We use keywords and gestures to communicate with each other, with which we can quickly indicate at what tempo a song is, where there are breaks, which progression we follow or how we end the song.

Below is a list of our means of communication.

Tempo

  • Slow
  • Up Slow
  • 6/8
  • 4/4
  • Shuffle medium (Classic Chicago Blues)
  • Shuffle up
  • Shuffle Up Town (referring to the bass line)
  • Shuffle Down Town (bass line)
  • Humpty dumpty (Shuffle; short and energetic)
  • Lumpty Dumpty (Shuffle; lazy, laid back)
  • Laid Back
  • Boogie
  • Boogaloo
  • Jungle Beat
  • Street Beat / New Orleans / Louisiana
  • Funky
  • Swing
  • Up Swing
  • Up Tempo

Signs

  • The chords are indicated by the fingers: 1 finger, 4 or 5
  • A nod of the head, that means "yes" as you are used to do it
  • The musician shouts "watch me", which means that an unusual passage is coming and the others must follow him/her
  • Tapping the top of the head with the flat of your hand means "From The Top)
  • Raising a hand means "watch out, the end of the song or there's a break coming"
  • Moving the flat hand down means "turn the volume down"
  • The artist points to the musician, who is going to solo. That is usually two rounds (24 bars). If the soloist takes an extra round, he will indicate this
  • If the last line is repeated at the end, it is always repeated three times
  • If the song ends on a break, the musicians continue counting and fall back on the one. Never leave the singer hanging there
  • Through experience, the musicians know where the cues in the song are, where you can give a sign for, for example: a break, a bridge, the end, a quick change, to change the chord, repeating the ending

To count down a number

  • 1 - - 2 - -
  • 1 n 2 n 3 n 4
  • 1 2 3 4
  • 1 2 3, 1n 2n 3n
  • 1 - 2 you know what to do
  • The artist starts alone, the band joins in at 4 or after a round

Progression

  • Minor / major
  • 1 - 4 - 5 (Standard)
  • 1 - 5 - 4
  • 1 - 5 - #
  • 2 - 5 - 1
  • 1 - 4, 1 - 5
  • Stay in 1
  • Long 1 (referring to a long 8-line verse, usually ending with a break)
  • Turn Around (T.A., intermezzo between verses: 1 - 4 - 1 - 5)
  • Quick Change (1 - 4 - 1, 4 - 1 - 5 - 4 -1, T.A.)
  • Verse, Chorus, Bridge, Break
  • From The Top
  • Vamp (improvise on the theme or first chord)

Referring to well-known classic blues songs

  • Sweet Home Chicago
  • Dust My Broom
  • Going Down Slow
  • Hoochie Coochie Man
  • Woke Uo This Morning
  • Big Boss Man
  • Every Day I Have The Blues / T-Bone Shuffle
  • Stormy Monday (progression)
  • Mojo Working

Sources: Thomas Moon: The Verdict Of Big Joe Williams, weeniecampbell.com, BBC news, Talkin' to myself: Blues lyrics, Michael Taft, digitalcitizen.ca, federalcigarjugband.com, pancocojams.blogspot.nl, americanbluesscene.com, YouTube, Wikipedia, Hudson Motors Compagny, Archive Minneapolis, The Cruel Plains, M.H.Price a.o., truewestmagazine.com, The Austin Chronicle, Cambridge Free English Dictionary, Oxford Dictionary, TheSaurus.com, dragonjazz.com/grablue/blues_travel, Encyclopedia of African American Popular Culture, Blues by Paul Breman, Blues by David Harrison, Quora.com, urbandictionary.com, Blogs.loc.gov, The Ballad Hunter by Alan Lomax, Black Pearls: Blues Queens of the 1920th by Daphne Duval Harrison, jopiepopie.blogspot.nl, redhotjazz.com, The Blues Lyrics Formula by Michael Taft, American Ballads and Folk Songs by Alan Lomax and John Avery Lomax, The Past Is Not Dead: Essays from the  Southern Quarterly by Douglas B. Chambers, EarlyBlues.com, railroad-line.com,  Jason Lee Davis' RailFan Pages , centertruthjustice.org

zzwr | Rory Gallagher’s 1971 Eponymous Debut Album 50th Anniversary Edition Box Set

RORY GALLAGHER

1971 EPONYMOUS DEBUT ALBUM 50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION BOX SET (1971-2021)
4CD+1DVD DELUXE BOX SET, 2CD, LIMITED EDITION 3LP, LIMITED EDITION 1LP NEON ORANGE VINYL SUPER DELUXE DIGITAL, DELUXE DIGITAL HD AND DELUXE DIGITAL STANDARD

Five-disc Deluxe Box Set includes a new mix of the original album, 30 previously unreleased outtakes and alternate takes, a six-song 1971 BBC Radio John Peel Sunday concert, four BBC Radio session tracks, plus previously unreleased 50-minute DVD of Rory's first-ever solo concert which was filmed in Paris for the “Pop Deux” television show.

To celebrate the 50th Anniversary of Rory Gallagher's eponymous 1971 debut solo album, UMC/UMe is pleased to announce the September 3 release of a five-disc deluxe box set of the album. Rory Gallagher 50th Anniversary Edition will include a brand-new mix of the original album, 30 previously unreleased outtakes and alternate takes, a six-song 1971 BBC Radio John Peel Sunday Concert, plus four 1971 BBC Radio Sounds of the Seventies session tracks, all mastered at Abbey Road Studios.
Also included is a previously unreleased 50-minute DVD of Rory's first-ever solo concert which was filmed in Paris for the “Pop Deux” television show.
The extensive box set package will also contain a 32-page hardback book with many rare and previously unseen photographs from British rock photographer Barrie Wentzell, essays and memorabilia from the album recording including hand-written song lyrics by Rory, and an exclusive limited-edition poster.
The 2CD and 3LP editions of the album will be cut-down versions from the deluxe box set. There will also be a special limited-edition Neon Orange (transparent) 1LP featuring the John Peel Sunday Concert exclusively available via UMG’s online stores uDiscover and Sound of Vinyl.

The box set will also include exclusive liner notes written by his brother and manager Donal Gallagher, his long-time bass guitarist Gerry McAvoy (1970-1991) and photographer Barrie Wentzell, plus a full 1971 interview with Rory by journalist Roy Eldridge.

The debut album features some of the most beloved Rory songs such as “I Fall Apart” (Rory’s second most streamed song), “Laundromat” and “Just The Smile.” While reviewing numerous tapes during the 2021 mixing sessions, two songs were added to the collection: the previously unreleased “At The Bottom,” a track Rory ended up re-recording for his 1975 Against The Grain album, plus “Advision Jam,” a rocking instrumental. The recording saw Rory Gallagher on guitar and lead vocals as well as alto sax, harmonica and mandolin, Gerry McAvoy on bass and Wilgar Campbell on drums. Atomic Rooster’s Vincent Crane plays piano on two out of the 10 songs on the album “Wave Myself Goodbye” and “I’m Not Surprised.”
Rory had not played live since his previous band Taste disbanded on October 24, 1970.  When Rory’s eponymous solo album was released in May 1971, he embarked on a 16-date UK tour that included 10 days touring Ireland and a short jaunt in Switzerland.  
Recorded at the legendary Advision Studios in Fitzrovia, London, Rory’s eponymous debut album showcases the Irish guitarist as a multi-faceted interpreter of the blues with a cross-section of the blues from acoustic to heavy blues soul. Advision was one of the hottest recording studios in the 60s and 70s and home of classic albums recorded by The Yardbirds, The Who, The Move, T. Rex, David Bowie, Kate Bush, Elton John, Slade, Gentle Giant, Gerry Rafferty, and many more.

If ever there was a “musician’s musician” then that accolade belongs to Rory Gallagher. Renowned for his blistering live performances and highly respected for his dedication to his craft, he died in 1995, aged just 47.
Rory’s timeless reputation has continued to flourish in the years since. Indeed, some of rock’s most seminal figures, from Jimi Hendrix to Eric Clapton, Joe Satriani to Joe Bonamassa, Queen’s Brian May to The Smiths’ Johnny Marr, Slash of Guns N Roses to the Edge of U2, have cited him as an influence. Rory remains a touchstone for all would-be guitar heroes in the 21st Century.

FORMATS AND TRACKLISTING

4CD + 1 DVD Deluxe Set / Super Deluxe Digital
CD1
Laundromat - 50th Anniversary Edition
Just The Smile - 50th Anniversary Edition
I Fall Apart - 50th Anniversary Edition
Wave Myself Goodbye - 50th Anniversary Edition
Hands Up - 50th Anniversary Edition
Sinner Boy - 50th Anniversary Edition
For The Last Time - 50th Anniversary Edition
It's You - 50th Anniversary Edition
I'm Not Surprised - 50th Anniversary Edition
Can't Believe It's True - 50th Anniversary Edition

CD2
Gypsy Woman - Tangerine Studio Session
It Takes Time - Tangerine Studio Session
I Fall Apart - Tangerine Studio Session
Wave Myself Goodbye - Tangerine Studio Session
At The Bottom - Alternate Take 1
At The Bottom - Alternate Take 2
At The Bottom - Alternate Take 3
At The Bottom - Alternate Take 4
Advision Jam
Laundromat - Alternate Take 1
Just The Smile - Alternate Take 1
Just The Smile - Alternate Take 2
I Fall Apart - Alternate Take 1
Wave Myself Goodbye - Alternate Take 1
Wave Myself Goodbye - Alternate Take 2

CD3
Hands Up - Alternate Take 1
Hands Up - Alternate Take 2
Hands Up - Alternate Take 3
Hands Up - Alternate Take 4
Hands Up - Alternate Take 5
Hands Up - Alternate Take 6
Sinner Boy - Alternate Take 1
Sinner Boy - Alternate Take 2
Sinner Boy - Alternate Take 3
For The Last Time - Alternate Take 1
For The Last Time - Alternate Take 2
For The Last Time - Alternate Take 3
It's You - Alternate Take 1
It's You - Alternate Take 2
I'm Not Surprised - Alternate Take 1
I'm Not Surprised - Alternate Take 2
Can't Believe It's True - Alternate Take 1

CD4

For The Last Time - Live On BBC "Sounds Of The Seventies" / 1971*
Laundromat - Live On BBC "Sounds Of The Seventies" / 1971*
It Takes Time - Live On BBC "Sounds Of The Seventies" / 1971*
I Fall Apart - Live On BBC "Sounds Of The Seventies" / 1971*
Hands Up - Live On BBC "John Peel Sunday Concert" / 1971
For The Last Time - Live On BBC "John Peel Sunday Concert" / 1971
In Your Town - Live On BBC "John Peel Sunday Concert" / 1971
Just The Smile - Live On BBC "John Peel Sunday Concert" / 1971
Laundromat - Live On BBC "John Peel Sunday Concert" / 1971
It Takes Time - Live On BBC "John Peel Sunday Concert" / 1971
* Off air recording

DVD
Interview
Hands Up
Wave Myself Goodbye
It Takes Time
Sinner Boy
For the Last Time
The Same Thing
I Fall Apart

2CD

CD1
Laundromat - 50th Anniversary Edition
Just The Smile - 50th Anniversary Edition
I Fall Apart - 50th Anniversary Edition
Wave Myself Goodbye - 50th Anniversary Edition
Hands Up - 50th Anniversary Edition
Sinner Boy - 50th Anniversary Edition
For The Last Time - 50th Anniversary Edition
It's You - 50th Anniversary Edition
I'm Not Surprised - 50th Anniversary Edition
Can't Believe It's True - 50th Anniversary Edition

CD2
Gypsy Woman - Tangerine Studio Session
It Takes Time - Tangerine Studio Session
I Fall Apart - Tangerine Studio Session
At The Bottom - Alternate Take 3
At The Bottom - Alternate Take 4
Advision Jam
Laundromat - Alternate Take 1
Just The Smile - Alternate Take 1
Wave Myself Goodbye - Alternate Take 2
Hands Up - Alternate Take 2
Sinner Boy - Alternate Take 3
For The Last Time - Alternate Take 1
It's You - Alternate Take 2
I'm Not Surprised - Alternate Take 1
For The Last Time - Live On BBC "Sounds Of The Seventies" / 1971*
Laundromat - Live On BBC "Sounds Of The Seventies" / 1971*
It Takes Time - Live On BBC "Sounds Of The Seventies" / 1971*
I Fall Apart - Live On BBC "Sounds Of The Seventies" / 1971*
* Off air recording

3LP
SIDE A
Laundromat - 50th Anniversary Edition
Just The Smile - 50th Anniversary Edition
I Fall Apart - 50th Anniversary Edition
Wave Myself Goodbye - 50th Anniversary Edition
Hands Up - 50th Anniversary Edition

SIDE B
Sinner Boy - 50th Anniversary Edition
For The Last Time - 50th Anniversary Edition
It's You - 50th Anniversary Edition
I'm Not Surprised - 50th Anniversary Edition
Can't Believe It's True - 50th Anniversary Edition

SIDE C
Gypsy Woman - Tangerine Studio Session
It Takes Time - Tangerine Studio Session
I Fall Apart - Tangerine Studio Session
At The Bottom - Alternate Take 3
At The Bottom - Alternate Take 4
Advision Jam

SIDE D
Laundromat - Alternate Take 1
Just The Smile - Alternate Take 1
Wave Myself Goodbye - Alternate Take 2
Hands Up - Alternate Take 2

SIDE E
Sinner Boy - Alternate Take 3
For The Last Time - Alternate Take 1
It's You - Alternate Take 2
I'm Not Surprised - Alternate Take 1

SIDE F
For The Last Time - Live On BBC "Sounds Of The Seventies" / 1971*
Laundromat - Live On BBC "Sounds Of The Seventies" / 1971*
It Takes Time - Live On BBC "Sounds Of The Seventies" / 1971*
I Fall Apart - Live On BBC "Sounds Of The Seventies" / 1971*
* Off air recording

1LP Neon Orange (transparent) Vinyl -

John Peel Sunday Concert 28/08/1971

SIDE A
Hands Up - Live On BBC "John Peel Sunday Concert" / 1971
For The Last Time - Live On BBC "John Peel Sunday Concert" / 1971
In Your Town - Live On BBC "John Peel Sunday Concert" / 1971

SIDE B

Just The Smile - Live On BBC "John Peel Sunday Concert" / 1971
Laundromat - Live On BBC "John Peel Sunday Concert" / 1971
It Takes Time - Live On BBC "John Peel Sunday Concert" / 1971

Deluxe Digital HD / Deluxe Digital Standard

Laundromat - 50th Anniversary Edition
Just The Smile - 50th Anniversary Edition
I Fall Apart - 50th Anniversary Edition
Wave Myself Goodbye - 50th Anniversary Edition
Hands Up - 50th Anniversary Edition
Sinner Boy - 50th Anniversary Edition
For The Last Time - 50th Anniversary Edition
It's You - 50th Anniversary Edition
I'm Not Surprised - 50th Anniversary Edition
Can't Believe It's True - 50th Anniversary Edition
Gypsy Woman - Tangerine Studio Session
It Takes Time - Tangerine Studio Session
I Fall Apart - Tangerine Studio Session
At The Bottom - Alternate Take 3
At The Bottom - Alternate Take 4
Advision Jam
Laundromat - Alternate Take 1
Just The Smile - Alternate Take 1
Wave Myself Goodbye - Alternate Take 2
Hands Up - Alternate Take 2
Sinner Boy - Alternate Take 3
For The Last Time - Alternate Take 1
It's You - Alternate Take 2

For further information, artwork and photos, please visit:  HERE

www.noblepr.co.uk/

zzwv | Guitarists: Every Day I Have the Blues

sayings_kwibus

#4 Guitarists

In this column: every day i have the blues, Eric Clapton, B.B. King, Albert King, Elmore James, T-Bone Walker, Buddy Guy, Jack Pearson with Josh Smith & Kirk Fletcher, Robert J. Lockwood, Peter Greens Fleetwood Mac, Memphis Slim with Matt “Guitar” Murphy, Jimmy Burns, Matt Schofield & Henrik Freischlader, Luther Allison with Otis Rush & Eric Clapton, Johnny Winter & B.B. King, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Jimmy Witherspoon & Robben Ford

How different guitarists tackle the classic blues song "Every Day I Have The Blues".

Sources: thegearpage, Thomas Moon: The Verdict Of Big Joe Williams, weeniecampbell.com, BBC news, Talkin' to myself: Blues lyrics, Michael Taft, digitalcitizen.ca, federalcigarjugband.com, pancocojams.blogspot.nl, americanbluesscene.com, YouTube, Wikipedia, Hudson Motors Compagny, Archive Minneapolis, The Cruel Plains, M.H.Price a.o., truewestmagazine.com, The Austin Chronicle, Cambridge Free English Dictionary, Oxford Dictionary, TheSaurus.com, dragonjazz.com/grablue/blues_travel, Encyclopedia of African American Popular Culture, Blues by Paul Breman, Blues by David Harrison, Quora.com, urbandictionary.com, Blogs.loc.gov, The Ballad Hunter by Alan Lomax, Black Pearls: Blues Queens of the 1920th by Daphne Duval Harrison, jopiepopie.blogspot.nl, redhotjazz.com, The Blues Lyrics Formula by Michael Taft, American Ballads and Folk Songs by Alan Lomax and John Avery Lomax, The Past Is Not Dead: Essays from the  Southern Quarterly by Douglas B. Chambers, EarlyBlues.com, railroad-line.com,  Jason Lee Davis' RailFan Pages , centertruthjustice.org

zzws | Ambedo new ALBUM Ellis Mano Band

Swiss-based four-piece blues rock band Ellis Mano Band release their third single Ambedo Mind on Friday 9th July. The single is taken from the band’s sophomore album Ambedo that was released on Friday June 25th by Jazzhaus Records.

The band's critically acclaimed new album went to #2 in the Official Swiss Album Chart.

Ellis Mano Band describe their trademark well-produced sound as “a sort of rock n’ soul, rooted deep down in the blues.”
“Smooth, sexy, and horn-section-soulful, this song is a nod to the soul and R&B greats,” is how the band's guitarist, Edis Mano, describes the Ambedo Mind single.“During the pandemic, I taught myself filmmaking which is something I have wanted to do that for years," says Edis about the making of the Ambedo Mind music video.
Keep It Simple and The Question were the first two music videos I made,” continues Edis. “With Ambedo Mind I wanted to have a cinematographic reference to the subject of Ambedo. That's why we took the macro recordings with a special lens. This optic makes the smallest objects appear gigantic. This is exactly how we behave during the process of creating an album. The smallest details are often discussed very intensively. There are many parallels.”
In Switzerland, Ellis Mano Band are not unlike the Wrecking Crew or the Funk Brothers. They are top-flight studio musicians and elites in the Swiss music scene. Although they spent years recording with other artists, they never had much time to make music of their own until now.
"Ambedo Mind unleashes a smooth, soulful horn section. Chris’ voice rises effortlessly to the challenge of reproducing the 60’s R&B Greats. Underneath is a wonderful looping bassline, for someone who doesnt like soul, this is very impressive!"

- Velvet Thunder

"Crisp clean guitar licks flow effortlessly in the intro of Ambedo Mind, as the snare drum snaps along with a cool cymbal tap that just gets this track beaming with awesome tones and musicality. Bass chords, funky groove beats, soulful vocals gives you goosebumps." - Jace Media

“We chose the album title Ambedo because it reflects the state of the process of recording an album,” says guitarist Edis Mano. Ambedo refers to the tendency both to reflect and to absorb. As musicians, we do its all the time, especially when we write new songs and create an album.”
Every track on the new album is rich with perfectly chosen detail including Chris Ellis’s rough voice, Edis Mano’s vintage sounding guitar playing, and the tight rhythm section of drummer Nico Looser and Severin Graf (bass). The album also features Hammond B3 organ, and horns that reflect the blazing summer heat during which they were recorded. The harmonious backing vocals are reminiscent of something you would hear from Muscle Shoals Studios. 
“We would get together with just a few ideas, fill it out, let it grow, work on it, with a great passion,” says Chris. “For session musicians, it was not about having just another project to play on, but it was an opportunity for us to play as a real band again. It was a great feeling to see the guys together and getting emotional from time to time playing the music.”
The album was recorded at Edis Mano’s Studio E10 with a lot of vintage gear and instruments, resulting in a contemporary sound. The songs were recorded live with a few  overdubs, including backing vocals and horns.
The album is nothing short of brilliant. With Ambedo, the Ellis Mano Band presents a rich tapestry of universal joy and sorrow; the awkward moment after a one-night stand in Breakfast, the desperation and grief in Long Road and the loud, social criticism in The Horrible Truth.
The songs are saturated in a deep respect and understanding of American roots music, from the early blues of the American South through to the blues rock revolution of 1960s Britain.
Influenced by Led Zeppelin, J.J. Cale, Tedeschi Trucks Band, Jimi Hendrix and more recently John Mayer, the Ellis Mano Band have put their own unique stamp on the blues which, in recent years, has become a shared global phenomenon.
“Making this music was fascinating, it was really easy to create the music and take it further,” said Chris. “It was a beautiful experience and I hope we can repeat it time and time again.”

AMBEDO - TRACK LISTING

THE HORRIBLE TRUTH (3:31)
SWEET SIN (3:12)
AMBEDO MIND (3:34)
THE FIGHT FOR PEACE (5:45)
JOHNNY & SUSIE (4:04)
LONG ROAD (3:49)
THE QUESTION (3:36)
BREAKFAST (5:44)
KEEP IT SIMPLE (4:16)
HEART ‘N MIND (4:07)

 

Band Line-Up

Chris Ellis – Vocals
Edis Mano – Guitars
Severin Graf – Bass
Nico Looser – Drums

Production Credits

Music by Edis Mano & Chris Ellis
Lyrics by Shane Brady
Recorded by Edis Mano
Arranged by Ellis Mano Band
Mixed by Oli Boesch
Mastered by Oli Boesch
Produced by Edis Mano
Recorded at Studio E10
Additional Musicians
Manuel Halter – Keyboards on all Tracks except Track 7
Lachy Doley – Hammond Organ (Track 7)
Cathryn Lehmann – Backing Vocals
Lesley Bogaert – Backing Vocals
Dave Blaser – Trumpet
Flo Egli – Saxophone
Lukas Wyss – Trombone
Benjamin Hartwig – Violin (Track 6)
Roberto Hacaturyan – Percussion

For interviews with Ellis Mano Band, and to download images, visit: 

www.noblepr.co.uk/press-releases/ellis-mano-band/ambedo.htm

zzwx | Guitarists (4): slides (2)

sayings_kwibus

#4 Guitarists: slides (2)

In this column:

Little finger

Bottleneck on the little finger

Different ways to hold the slide

The sleeve slide is held in three different ways: with the little finger, the ring finger and the middle finger. The other fingers are used to steer and hold the slide. With the slide on the pinky position you still have three fingers, which can make chords in between. Guitarists who play a lot of notes use the ring finger because it gives them more grip. Playing slide with the little finger takes more practice.

Below are some guitarists who play with their pinkies.

Muddy Waters
Sonny Landreth
Elmore James
J.B. Hutto
Lil' Ed (and the Imperials)
Keb Mo

Ring finger

A guitarist playing slide with his ring finger and using a thumb, index and middle finger pick for a powerful tone

Some guitarists who play with their ring finger.

Derek Trucks
Derek Trucks Dunlop bottle slide
Duane Allman
Rory Gallagher

Middle finger

Middle finger
Bonnie Raitt
Joe Walsh

Different ways to hold the slide (lap)

Slide guitarists, who hold the guitar in lap position, where the slide is not put on the finger but is slid back and forth over the strings from above.

Steel Lap Tonebar

John Hiatt & Jerry Douglas

Robert Randolph & Steve Ray Ladson

Sources: happy bluesman, tdpri.com, Thomas Moon: The Verdict Of Big Joe Williams, weeniecampbell.com, BBC news, Talkin' to myself: Blues lyrics, Michael Taft, digitalcitizen.ca, federalcigarjugband.com, pancocojams.blogspot.nl, americanbluesscene.com, YouTube, Wikipedia, Hudson Motors Compagny, Archive Minneapolis, The Cruel Plains, M.H.Price a.o., truewestmagazine.com, The Austin Chronicle, Cambridge Free English Dictionary, Oxford Dictionary, TheSaurus.com, dragonjazz.com/grablue/blues_travel, Encyclopedia of African American Popular Culture, Blues by Paul Breman, Blues by David Harrison, Quora.com, urbandictionary.com, Blogs.loc.gov, The Ballad Hunter by Alan Lomax, Black Pearls: Blues Queens of the 1920th by Daphne Duval Harrison, jopiepopie.blogspot.nl, redhotjazz.com, The Blues Lyrics Formula by Michael Taft, American Ballads and Folk Songs by Alan Lomax and John Avery Lomax, The Past Is Not Dead: Essays from the  Southern Quarterly by Douglas B. Chambers, EarlyBlues.com, railroad-line.com,  Jason Lee Davis' RailFan Pages , centertruthjustice.org

zzwt | Troy Redfern releases new album The Fire Cosmic ( Ghosts free download)

TROY REDFERN RELEASES "GHOSTS" AS FREE DOWNLOAD FROM UPCOMING ALBUM "THE FIRE COSMIC"

DOWNLOAD "GHOSTS" FROM www.troyredfern.com

 

Hailed as the King of British slide guitar, Troy Redfern, has today released a free download of a new song Ghosts taken from his upcoming album The Fire Cosmic released August 6th.
Ghosts opens with an atmospheric Appalachian style motif played on Troy’s trademark sound performed with heavily-worn 1929 National Triolian resonator guitar which sets the stylistic tone of his new studio album
Against the backdrop of Darby Todd’s ‘train beat’ drum shuffle, Ghosts gradually builds with subtly-layered acoustic textures, as it builds it's way towards a massive chorus.
Dave Marks' understated "country feel" bassline underpins the verses, and creates a sonic wave in the solo section. Troy’s resonator guitar, surfs, ducks, weaves, and reaches it’s final climax before hitting the chorus in high gear.
The new album follows five unprecedented albums Troy released in 2020. It was recorded at the legendary Rockfield Studios in North Wales, the same studio where Queen recorded all their early albums including Sheer Heart Attack (1974) followed by A Night At The Opera (1975).
For the new album, Troy enlisted one of the best rhythm sections in the UK, including the legendary Darby Todd on drums (The Darkness, Martin Barre, Paul Gilbert), and virtuoso bass guitarist Dave Marks (Hans Zimmer).
Guitarist Ron ‘Bumblefoot’ Thal (Guns ‘N Roses, Asia, Sons of Apollo), plays guitar on the song On Fire.

Troy describes the contributors on the album as “the ultimate dream team” on what is arguably the British guitarist’s most distinctive and powerful release to date.
“I chose Rockfield Studios because so much of the music I grew up listening to was recorded at this legendary studio (Queen, Black Sabbath)," says Troy. "The studio has a timeless reputation for all the iconic, classic albums that have been produced there.”
“It was important for me to capture the raw energy of three guys playing live in the same place, at the same time. That’s something that you just can't get if you’re sending files from different locations, it doesn't have the same vibe or feel if you do it that way.”
As soon as we arrived at Rockfield, everyone, including Darby and Dave who’ve recorded all over the world, were excited to be there,” continues Troy. “It’s that kind of place. It has that effect on every musician who records there. Even before we started recording, the energy and vibe was there, which definitely set the tone for the entire album.”
Troy cut his teeth and refined his style over the last few years, playing festival main stages and blazing a trail across Europe, Scandinavia, and Russia. He’s also become a well-known draw on the UK Blues Rock festival circuit, playing alongside rock luminaries including Robert Plant.

The forthcoming studio album is a culmination everything Troy has learnt so far on his musical journey, and, more importantly, brings into sharp focus a much tighter song-writing and more visceral, muscular production style.
For production duties, Troy enlisted the Brighton- based producer Paul ‘Win’ Winstanley, best known for his epic rock production style, and whom Troy met and had worked with previously on the 2019 RHR album, Hotel Toledo. Troy and Win bonded immediately, and shared the same musical aesthetic, no nonsense work ethic and dry sense of humour.
Rockfield’s vintage mics, mixing desk, and analogue outboard gear gave Win options to capture the dynamic performances on the album. “It was like being a kid in a candy store,” says Win.
“It was important for the album to sound massive,” says Troy. “It was a much bigger sound than anything that I’ve released before. As soon as we heard the first takes in the control, we were blown away. We knew that we captured something special. It sounded fantastic.”
“For the session, Darby Todd brought his vintage Ludwig Vistalite acrylic drums of John Bonham fame. The drums are renowned for sounding massive. Hearing them in one of the best drum rooms in the world, they sounded out of this world! Roger Taylor’s drums recorded for Queen’s Sheer Heart Attack album at Rockfield are some of my favourite drum sounds ever."
Ron ‘Bumblefoot’ Thal states, “It all starts with the drums, if you’ve got a great drummer, great sounding room, great board, it’s going to sound phenomenal, and it does!”
“I met Ron at a festival in Poland that we were both playing at, we immediately hit it off,” recalls Troy. “He let me use his signature double neck guitar to play on Anthony Gomes encore set at the festival, that was an absolute blast. He’s such a cool, generous guy. When I returned to the UK, I emailed him to ask if he’d like to play on my new album. He was totally fired up to do it.”
Troy continues, “The album really is a step up. It’s the best album I’ve made. Hiring Rockfield, getting the best players, the best producer – it was a risk, but it paid off tenfold. I’ve made an album I really couldn't be happier with.”
“With all the hard work that went into getting this album to sound as great as possible, there was only one option when it came to mastering. I decided to hire Frank Arkwright (Biffy Clyro, Oasis, Iggy Pop, Paul Weller, System of a Down). Frank is the senior mastering engineer at Abbey Road Studios. The mastering at Abbey Road added that final sheen. Frank did an absolutely amazing job in bringing out every nuance of the recording.”
“When it came to the album artwork, I was originally going to get an artist from Brazil to do it for me, however, I started working on some artwork of my own in the silver age Marvel comics style, based on the four guys that were on the album. I posted a few visuals on the socials and was overwhelmed by the response.

It was a huge kick getting responses from Joe Satriani, Richie Kotzen and my slide guitar hero Denny Walley of Frank Zappa fame. As a result, I created my own comic-style illustrations to package the album.”

MUSICIANS

TROY REDFERN – VOCALS, GUITARS

RON ‘BUMBLEFOOT’ THAL – GUITARS (TRACK 5)
DARBY TODD – DRUMS
DAVE MARKS - BASS, PIANO, KEYS, PERCUSSION
RECORDED & MIXED AT ROCKFIELD STUDIOS BY PAUL ‘WIN’ WINSTANLEY
ASSISTANT ENGINEER – JOE JONES
MASTERED BY FRANK ARKWRIGHT AT ABBEY ROAD STUDIOS

TRACK LISTING
1. SCORPIO (4:50)
2. WAITING FOR YOUR LOVE (3:34)
3. ONE WAY TICKET (3:50)
4. LOVE & WAR (4:37)
5. ON FIRE (4:09)
6. LAY THAT LOVE DOWN (3:23)
7. GHOSTS (4:02)
8. SAVING GRACE (4:07)
9. SANCTIFY (3:46)
10. STONE (5:50)

The Fire Cosmic

TROY REDFERN
ON TOUR WITH 'ROBERT JON & THE WRECK'

SEPTEMBER 2021 UK TOUR
Tickets: www.altticket.com, www.planetrocktickets.co.uk

Cardiff, The Globe
Thursday 16 September 2021

Sittingbourne, The Bourne Music Club
Friday 17 September 2021

Chester, Live Rooms
Saturday 18 September 2021

Leeds, Brudenell Social Club
Sunday 19 September 2021

Newcastle, The Cluny
Monday 20 September 2021

Manchester, Night & Day
Tuesday 21 September 2021

Nottingham, The Bodega
Wednesday 22 September 2021

London, The 100 Club
Thursday 23 September 2021

Edinburgh, Voodoo Rooms
Friday 24 September 2021

Aberdeen, Cafe Drummond
Saturday 25 September 2021

Hartlepool, South Durham Steel Works Club
Sunday 26 September 2021

# # #

TROY REDFERN
ON TOUR WITH 'WILLE & THE BANDITS'

March/April 2022 UK Tour
Tickets: www.willeandthebandits.com

Palladium, Bideford
Friday 4 March 2022

Old Bakery, Truro
Saturday 5 March 2022

Phoenix, Exeter
Sunday 6 March 2022

The Musician, Leicester
Wednesday 9 March 2022

The Flowerpot, Derby
Thursday 10 March 2022

The Bullingdon, Oxford
Friday 11 March 2022

Philharmonic, Liverpool
Saturday 12 March 2022

Continental, Preston
Wednesday 16 March 2022

Bodega, Nottingham
Thursday 17 March 2022

Hug & Pint, Glasgow
Friday 18 March 2022

The Cluny, Newcastle
Saturday 19 March 2022

Elsewhere, Margate
Wednesday 23 March 2022

Junction, Cambridge
Thursday 24 March 2022

The 100 Club, London
Friday 25 March 2022

Thekla, Bristol
Saturday 26 March 2022

Guildhall, Gloucester
Wednesday 30 March 2022

The Greystones, Sheffield
Thursday 31 March 2022

Town Hall, Selby
Friday 1 April 2022

The Tivoli, Buckley
Saturday 2 April 2022

The Star, Guildford
Wednesday 6 April 2022

The Robin, Bilston
Thursday 7 April 2022

Arts Centre, Bridgwater
Friday 8 April 2022

Theatr Brycheiniog, Brecon
Saturday 9 April 2022

Nightrain, Bradford
Thursday 21 April 2022

The Tivoli, Wimborne
Friday 22 April 2022

Ropetackle, Brighton
Saturday 23 April 2022

INFO: NOBLEPR UK

zzwy | Guitarists (3): slides (1)

sayings_kwibus

#2 Gitarists: slides (1)

In this column: slides, Robert Johnson, Elmore James, Earl Hooker

William Christopher Handy

Slides are objects that allow the guitarist to create a violin-like tone. He/she slides the object over the snare and makes a note just above the fret. Different objects are used for sliding. W.C. Handy, the man who brought the blues to the general public in the early 1900s, saw a man on the station platform playing a blues song, accompanying himself on guitar and making notes with a knife. For example Robert Johnson used a brass sleeve, others used small medicine bottles or the bottlenecks that a finger would fit into.

CeDell Davis
Brass sleeve/slide
Bottleneck

The form of expression in blues is one of question and answer, statement and approval or disapproval. As the chords are plucked and in turn the slide plays a very expressive tone, the guitarist seems to be in a dialogue with his inner self or with an imaginary other person.
Besides the fact that the slide requires a special technique, the guitarist also has to provide a convincing tone. One of the first to do so was Elmore “The King of The Slide” James whose 'Dust My Broom' is still part of the classical repertoire today. Robert Johnson taught him to play slide with a metal sleeve on his finger. After the second world war, he created a specific electric sound in his brother's electric shop with parts from the shop and unusual placement of two DeArmond pickups. He also “hot-wired” his amp to give it more power and distortion. It gave his guitar a unique edge that roused the dancing audience. Elmore often tuned his guitar in open D and E tuning.

Elmore James

Earl Hooker

Earl Hooker (according to B.B. King the best slide player he knew) played with a standard tuning and used a short steel slide, which made it easy for him to switch from chord to slide. His slide sound comes from his light touch on the strings, a technique he learned from Robert Nighthawk: instead of full-chord glissando effects, he prefers single-note runs. Later he played on double-neck Gibson guitar, first a 6 and 4-string bass combination, later a 12- and 6-string combination (for solo and rhythm accompaniment). For the tone, he experimented with the amplification and used an echo and tape delay to simultaneously play two solos in harmony. He also enriched the slide sound with the use of a wah-wah pedal.

A wah-wah works on the same principle, the effect comes just after you have created the tone. You have to let it happen organically, I sometimes compare it to breathing, look for the breathing support as a foothold to slide through the slide part.

60th Clyde McCoy Wah-Wah pedal

Nowadays there is a suitable slide for everyone: cloned to bottlenecks and pill bottles, glass tubes in different thicknesses, metal, copper and porcelain pipes (large and small). Acoustically, a resonator guitar is used because it produces more volume, giving you a better and more controllable tone. Electrically, the amplifier sound is overdriven or a fuzz or distortion is introduced.

Steel slide (Jon's)

I started with a glass slide from Dunlop (no 201), because I play with a medium action and with a standard tuning. This slide is thin and light so I can create slide notes with a light touch. The downside is that they are fragile and don't produce much volume. The thicker no 203 doesn't give me much grip on the strings and is just a bit too narrow for my little finger. In the end I've been playing with the cheapest steel slide out there for years and it's indestructible, has the right weight for vibrato and fits my little finger perfectly.

Sources: happy bluesman, tdpri.com, Thomas Moon: The Verdict Of Big Joe Williams, weeniecampbell.com, BBC news, Talkin' to myself: Blues lyrics, Michael Taft, digitalcitizen.ca, federalcigarjugband.com, pancocojams.blogspot.nl, americanbluesscene.com, YouTube, Wikipedia, Hudson Motors Compagny, Archive Minneapolis, The Cruel Plains, M.H.Price a.o., truewestmagazine.com, The Austin Chronicle, Cambridge Free English Dictionary, Oxford Dictionary, TheSaurus.com, dragonjazz.com/grablue/blues_travel, Encyclopedia of African American Popular Culture, Blues by Paul Breman, Blues by David Harrison, Quora.com, urbandictionary.com, Blogs.loc.gov, The Ballad Hunter by Alan Lomax, Black Pearls: Blues Queens of the 1920th by Daphne Duval Harrison, jopiepopie.blogspot.nl, redhotjazz.com, The Blues Lyrics Formula by Michael Taft, American Ballads and Folk Songs by Alan Lomax and John Avery Lomax, The Past Is Not Dead: Essays from the  Southern Quarterly by Douglas B. Chambers, EarlyBlues.com, railroad-line.com,  Jason Lee Davis' RailFan Pages , centertruthjustice.org

zzwz | Guitarists (2): capo men

sayings_kwibus

#2 Guitarists

In this column: guitarists which use a capo

Using a capo

To make chords easier
To match your voice
To change keys (and to be able to play the same chord grips
In stead of tuning down
To brighten the tone of the guitar
To give the song a different timbre
If the action of the guitar is too high, you can lower it by placing a capo

Many songs are in E (also called 'the people's E') for a different timbre the song is transposed to F and to keep the same on strings a capo is placed on the first fret.

Clarence Gatemouth Brown

Brown uses a capo when playing in any key other than E Major; this enabled him to achieve slurs and trills that would otherwise have been impossible. Gatemouth has long fingers and does not use his index finger. Most of the time he moves his index finger around the capo with his thumb just stuck out straight over the top of his guitar. He is moving that capo around like we move our index finger in barre chords.

Clarence: "I don’t use no pick for one thing. I just use my hand. I use the meat part of my fingers, all five fingers, on the right hand. Then I also pick with my left hand for certain movements. I maybe use my left hand to do pickin’ at the same time with my right hand, my chord hand. I don’t use any picks at all."

Albert Collins

Albert explains how he plays a guitar with a capo

Eddie "Guitar Slim" Jones

Guitar Slim played with a capo on the first fret (F).

Some notes

Slim had a number-one hit on the Billboard R&B charts for six weeks straight with "The Things That I Used to Do". He claims the song came to him in a dream. In the dream, an angel fought a devil, each of them holding a set of lyrics to a song.

It's a masterpiece of pre–rock-‘n’-roll New Orleans R&B. The guitar sound is warm and up-front, distorted by volume, and backed by a swinging band. Volume was important to Slim's sound, which was, by all accounts, difficult to translate in the studio.

Guitar Slim was a great showman and most outrageous performer in the history of New Orleans music. He would dye his hair the same color as his suit and shoes. One week it was red, the next blue, or yellow, and so on. He would enter a club through the front door, playing while moving through the crowd, and join his band onstage. He exited the stage in the same fashion, proceeding to his car and driving away while still playing.

On February 7, 1959, Eddie "Guitar Slim" Jones died of complications from pneumonia in New York City. He was 32 years old. His death was barely noticed due to another tragedy earlier that week, when Buddy Holly's plane went down in a cold Iowa night.

Sources: thegearpage, Thomas Moon: The Verdict Of Big Joe Williams, weeniecampbell.com, BBC news, Talkin' to myself: Blues lyrics, Michael Taft, digitalcitizen.ca, federalcigarjugband.com, pancocojams.blogspot.nl, americanbluesscene.com, YouTube, Wikipedia, Hudson Motors Compagny, Archive Minneapolis, The Cruel Plains, M.H.Price a.o., truewestmagazine.com, The Austin Chronicle, Cambridge Free English Dictionary, Oxford Dictionary, TheSaurus.com, dragonjazz.com/grablue/blues_travel, Encyclopedia of African American Popular Culture, Blues by Paul Breman, Blues by David Harrison, Quora.com, urbandictionary.com, Blogs.loc.gov, The Ballad Hunter by Alan Lomax, Black Pearls: Blues Queens of the 1920th by Daphne Duval Harrison, jopiepopie.blogspot.nl, redhotjazz.com, The Blues Lyrics Formula by Michael Taft, American Ballads and Folk Songs by Alan Lomax and John Avery Lomax, The Past Is Not Dead: Essays from the  Southern Quarterly by Douglas B. Chambers, EarlyBlues.com, railroad-line.com,  Jason Lee Davis' RailFan Pages , centertruthjustice.org

zzww | Robert Jon & The Wreck “Shine a Light on me Brother”

ROBERT JON & THE WRECK
"SHINE A LIGHT ON ME BROTHER"
NEW ALBUM RELEASED FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 3, 2021
AVAILABLE TO PRE-ORDER ON CD, VINYL, LTD DELUXE EDITION COLOURED VINYL & BUNDLES FROM robertjonandthewreck.com
NEW SINGLE: "SHINE A LIGHT ON ME BROTHER"
RELEASED FRIDAY JUNE 25, 2021
PRE-SAVE THE SINGLE ON SPOTIFY
AND PRE-ORDER THE ALBUM HERE

Robert Jon & The Wreck are back and ready to tear up the UK and Europe all over again with their new record, Shine A Light On Me Brother. The impressive new album, written and recorded during the COVID pandemic, and self-produced by Robert Jon & The Wreck, will be released on Friday September 3, 2021.

The title track Shine A Light On Me Brother, will be released as a single on Friday June 25th. Pre-save the single on Spotify and pre-order the album from https://ffm.to/rjtwshine.

Watch the official trailer for the forthcoming single HERE.
Robert Jon & The Wreck is comprised of Robert Jon Burrison (lead vocals, guitar), Andrew Espantman (drums, b. vocals), Steve Maggiora (keyboards, b. vocals), Henry James (lead guitar, b. vocals), and Warren Murrel (bass, b. vocals).
Robert Jon & The Wreck will take the new album on tour in September/October 2021 and February, April, May, June, and July 2022. The tour will hit the UK in September with special guest Troy Redfern. Tickets for the UK dates are available from www.alttickets.com and www.planetrocktickets.co.uk.
Shine a Light on Me Brother will be available on CD, Vinyl, limited Deluxe Vinyl (coloured) and in limited edition bundles – including a deluxe bundle including the Signed Deluxe Edition Vinyl, Ltd Edition T-shirt, signed CD, Ltd Edition retro California vanity plates, and signed Ltd Edition photos of Robert Jon & The Wreck. Pre-order the album from https://ffm.to/rjtwshine and www.robertjonandthewreck.com.
Robert Jon & The Wreck have supported the likes of Joe Bonamassa, Buddy Guy, Eric Gales, Living Colour, Chris Robinson Brotherhood, Walter Trout, Rival Sons, Robert Randolph & The Family Band, Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real, The Cadillac Three, Black Stone Cherry, Devon Allman Band, Billy Sheehan, Sturgill Simpson, and many more.
Robert Jon & The Wreck has been writing songs and releasing albums since the band’s conception in 2011. During this time, this quintet of follicular proficient gentlemen has been busy fine-tuning their sound playing to packed houses across Europe and the United States.
The band have received accolades and rave reviews for years now, from nominations of “Best Rock” and “Best Blues” and winning the title of “Best Live Band” at the Orange County Music Awards in 2013, to numerous top 10 chart placement on Southern Rock Brazil’s Top 20 Albums to being praised as “Classic and fresh at the same time” by Rock The Best Music, “Raising the bar for the Southern genre” by Blues Rock Review, and “keeping the history of classic 60’s and 70’s rock alive for newer generations” by blues guitar legend Joe Bonamassa.
ALBUM TRACKLIST
SHINE A LIGHT ON ME BROTHER
EVERYDAY
AIN'T NO YOUNG LOVE SONG
CHICAGO
HURRICANE
DESERT SUN
MOVIN’
ANNA MARIA
BROTHER
RADIO

SEPTEMBER 2021 UK TOUR WITH SPECIAL GUEST; TROY REDFERN

CARDIFF, THE GLOBE | Thursday 16 September 2021
SITTINGBOURNE, THE BOURNE MUSIC CLUB |Friday 17 September 2021 CHESTER, LIVE ROOMS | Saturday 18 September 2021
LEEDS, BRUDENELL SOCIAL CLUB | Sunday 19 September 2021
NEWCASTLE, THE CLUNY | Monday 20 September 2021
MANCHESTER, NIGHT & DAY | Tuesday 21st September 2021
NOTTINGHAM, THE BODEGA | Wednesday 22 September 2021
LONDON, THE 100 CLUB | Thursday 23 September 2021
EDINBURGH, VOODOO ROOMS | Friday 24 September 2021
ABERDEEN, CAFE DRUMMOND | Saturday 25 September 2021
HARTLEPOOL, SOUTH DURHAM STEEL WORKS CLUB |Sunday 26 September 2021

zzxc | Guitarists (1): left-handed

sayings_kwibus

#1 Guitarists: left-handed

In this column: guitarists who play left-handed: Albert King, Jimi Hendrix, Doyle Bramhall, Otis Rush

Albert King

It is customary to place the thick strings on top. Albert has the thin strings at the top, which makes it easier for him to pull down the strings and thus raise the string half or whole tone. That gives King its specific sound.

King: “I learned that style myself. And no one can duplicate it, though many have tried.”

King: “what you don’t play counts as much as what you do, and speed can be learned, but feeling must come from within. I do all of the vibrato with my hand. I don’t use no gadgets or anything. I used to only use Acoustic amps, but I went to a Roland 120 because it’s easier to handle and it puts out for me.
I play the singing guitar, that’s what I’ve always called it. I also sing along with my notes, it’s how I think about where I’m going.”

You’re also noted for your tendency to bend two strings at one time?
King: “Yeah. Lots of times I don’t intend to do that but I’m reaching for a bend and bring another one along. My fingers get mixed up, because I don’t practice. When I get through with a concert, I don’t even want to see my guitar for a while.”

Why haven’t you ever used a pick?
King: “I couldn’t hold one, my fingers were too big. I kept trying and the thing would fly across the house. I just always had a real hard time gripping it, so I learned to play without one.”

alanpaul.net

Jimi Hendrix

Jimi uses a right-handed guitar and flips it.

Doyle Bramhall II

Doyle uses a left-handed guitar and reverses the string order: thick down, thin up.

Otis Rush

Otis playing a right-handed guitar

Rush: “I learned to play by myself. Nobody helped me. Nobody teached me. That’s why I play left-handed. If somebody would have been there to teach me how to play the right way, I would have had my strings strung up the right way. But nobody was there, so I learned a note here and a note there, and here I am, still trying to learn.
You learn from listening to any guitar player. If you’re interested in learning about music, you just pick up things from each one. And from that, you put it into your style. But you don’t forget those particular notes, so you make up your own song. We all play like each other in a sense. If we all had to play our own music, there wouldn’t be too many musicians.”

guitar.com

A left-handed guitar

Rush: “ Because I had heard these guys (Howlin' Wolf, Little Walter, Muddy Waters) on stage and I said well I gotta' do something. I was working a day job and I quit the day job to make $5 a night. But like I said it was Muddy! That's the guy I kept my eyes on. And Little Walter, I began to watch him, Willie Mabon, Willie Dixon.”

travelingboy.com

Sources: Thomas Moon: The Verdict Of Big Joe Williams, weeniecampbell.com, BBC news, Talkin' to myself: Blues lyrics, Michael Taft, digitalcitizen.ca, federalcigarjugband.com, pancocojams.blogspot.nl, americanbluesscene.com, YouTube, Wikipedia, Hudson Motors Compagny, Archive Minneapolis, The Cruel Plains, M.H.Price a.o., truewestmagazine.com, The Austin Chronicle, Cambridge Free English Dictionary, Oxford Dictionary, TheSaurus.com, dragonjazz.com/grablue/blues_travel, Encyclopedia of African American Popular Culture, Blues by Paul Breman, Blues by David Harrison, Quora.com, urbandictionary.com, Blogs.loc.gov, The Ballad Hunter by Alan Lomax, Black Pearls: Blues Queens of the 1920th by Daphne Duval Harrison, jopiepopie.blogspot.nl, redhotjazz.com, The Blues Lyrics Formula by Michael Taft, American Ballads and Folk Songs by Alan Lomax and John Avery Lomax, The Past Is Not Dead: Essays from the  Southern Quarterly by Douglas B. Chambers, EarlyBlues.com, railroad-line.com,  Jason Lee Davis' RailFan Pages , centertruthjustice.org

zzxd | Iconic guitars: British and an Irish man (5)

sayings_kwibus

#5 Iconic guitars: British and an Irish man

In this column: blackie, greeny, ex-sunburst

BLACKIE - Eric Clapton

Of the hundreds of guitars that blues-rock legend Eric Clapton had his favorite was one that he had a hand in designing.
In 1970 Eric was at Sho-Bud guitar shop in Nashville and saw in a back room of the shop a rack of vintage Strats from the 1950s. Steve Winwood's white Fender had sparked his interest in Stratocasters. Eric said: "they were so out of fashion you could pick up a perfectly genuine Strat for two hundred or three hundred dollars—even less! So I bought all of them."

Stevie Winwood with his strat olympic white

Clapton gave one to Pete Townshend, one to Steve Winwood and another to George Harrison. He kept the three remaining guitars to himself, one of which was 1956 black strat. He liked the idea of having a black Strat, but he preferred the neck of another one of the guitars. The legendary Nashville luthier Ted Newman Jones put together the ultimate guitar with parts from all three guitars; "Blackie".
Jone used the ’56 Strat’s alder body with its black lacquer finish and the one-piece maple neck with its hard “V” shape from a ’57. The pickups were all standard Strat pickups; two were original from the mid-50s, and a third was from 1970.

Blackie front and back; Eric does not use a tremolo bar, so the tremolo is tilted on the body and springs are tightly tensioned

BLACKIE - Eric Clapton

The guitar would be Clapton’s main axe for the next dozen years. In 2004, she was sold at auction to benefit Clapton’s Crossroads Centre, in Antigua. At the time of the auction, she raised a record-setting of $959,500.

Badge - Eric Clapton (1977)

GREENY 59 BURST- Peter Green, Gary Moore, Kirk Hammett

Peter Green (Peter Allen Greenbaum) was an English blues singer-guitarist and one of the founders of Fleetwood Mac and the British blues.
In 1966, Green bought a second-hand guitar, during his bluesbreaker days, at the Selmers store in Charing Cross for £ 144. The Les Paul 59 sounded unlike other Gibsons; one of the pick-ups was fitted the wrong way around and when both pick-ups are played in the middle position, the instrument sounds more like a Fender Strat than a Gibson Les Paul.
The pickup was installed that way from the start as a factory error. Legendary guitar tech Jol Dantzig confirmed this, when he examined the guitar in 1984. This error wasn’t limited to Peter Green’s Les Paul, Joe Bonamassa also owns a burst Les Paul from the same era with the same defect.

Green, Moore and Hammett and Greeny

In 1970 Green sold it to Northern Irish guitarist Gary Moore (was 18 at the time) for all the money Moore could get by selling his Gibson SG guitar.
Gary said: “I had an SG and sold it for £160 and he came up to my flat for the money and gave me 40 or 50 quid back! He said, ‘I’ll tell you what, I’ll just take what I paid for it, which was 120 quid."
Subsequently, the guitar was involved in a car accident when a lorry went into the back of Gary’s car at Chiswick Flyover. “I just opened the boot and although the guitar was in a flight case, its neck was completely broken. But we got it repaired amazingly well, we put a steel bolt in the neck - it was in a terrible state, though.”
Gary named the guitar Greeny.

Joe with ‘Lazarus’ – the 1959 Les Paul he had restored to its original glory – performing a live streaming concert from Nashville’s Ryman Auditorium in September 2020

In 2006 Gary sold it to Phil Winfield at Maverick Guitars for somewhere between $750,000 and $1.2 million. In 2016, Kirk Hammett of Metallica bought the guitar for a reported $2 million.
Thus, the guitar became the unique specimen that was owned by three important guitarists.

2014 Peter Green, Kirk Hammett showing Greeny: The Gibson Les Paul Standaard "Burst" 1958-1960 with a mahogany body and a figured two-piece maple top, a mahogany neck with rosewood fretboard and PAF humbuckers

Oh well - Fleetwood Mac with Peter Green and Jeremy Spencer guitar

EX-SUNBURST - Rory Gallagher

Irish born guitar slinger, Rory Gallagher, bought in 1963 a 1961 Fender Sunburst Stratocaster in a local music store. A guitarist ordered a Fiesta Red, just like Hank Marvin from The Shadows, but Fender shipped a Sunburst. After that guitar arrived after six months, the Sunburst was put up for sale second-hand. Rory only paid £100 for it.

Gallagher’s 1961 Stratocaster, photographed in front of his extensive record collection

At the time, a Fender was a rarity and the man who later stole Rory's guitar didn't know what to do after a national call was made on Irish radio and threw it in a ditch. That way the guitar got its first damage.
The guitar was heavily modified. The neck had to be removed and dried out several times due to Gallagher’s profuse sweating on stage. Rory's rare and highly acidic blood type acted as a paint stripper, removing most of the varnish and the original Sunburst pattern. Because of its appearance, fans began calling the guitar, the “Ex-Sunburst".

Fender met Donal Gallagher, brother of Gallagher, in Los Angeles in 1997 and received his guitar. The Rory Gallagher Tribute Stratocaster guitar is an exact replica of that revered instrument: a extremely worn Three-color Sunburst alder body, maple neck and rosewood fingerboard, five Sperzel tuners and one Gotoh, the 12th-fret dot marker is white plastic, three custom-wound '60s single-coil pickups, aged chrome hardware, 21 medium jumbo frets and a synthetic bone nut.

After his death in 1995, the guitar was retired by his brother, Donal.

Bad Penny- Rory Gallagher (1982)

Sources: happy bluesman, tdpri.com, Thomas Moon: The Verdict Of Big Joe Williams, weeniecampbell.com, BBC news, Talkin' to myself: Blues lyrics, Michael Taft, digitalcitizen.ca, federalcigarjugband.com, pancocojams.blogspot.nl, americanbluesscene.com, YouTube, Wikipedia, Hudson Motors Compagny, Archive Minneapolis, The Cruel Plains, M.H.Price a.o., truewestmagazine.com, The Austin Chronicle, Cambridge Free English Dictionary, Oxford Dictionary, TheSaurus.com, dragonjazz.com/grablue/blues_travel, Encyclopedia of African American Popular Culture, Blues by Paul Breman, Blues by David Harrison, Quora.com, urbandictionary.com, Blogs.loc.gov, The Ballad Hunter by Alan Lomax, Black Pearls: Blues Queens of the 1920th by Daphne Duval Harrison, jopiepopie.blogspot.nl, redhotjazz.com, The Blues Lyrics Formula by Michael Taft, American Ballads and Folk Songs by Alan Lomax and John Avery Lomax, The Past Is Not Dead: Essays from the  Southern Quarterly by Douglas B. Chambers, EarlyBlues.com, railroad-line.com,  Jason Lee Davis' RailFan Pages , centertruthjustice.org

zzxe | Iconic guitars (4)

sayings_kwibus

#4 Iconic guitars

In this column: large gibson hollow bodies, nancy, number one

LARGE GIBSON HOLLOW BODIES - T-Bone Walker

T-Bone Walker (Aaron Thibeaux Walker, Dallas Texas) played on different guitars in three eras: 1930-1950 on a Gibson ES-250, 1950-1970 on an ES-5 and from 1970 on an ES-335. He used the guitars favored by the early jazz guitarists (like Charlie Christian). T-Bone Walker was a big influence on B.B. King, Albert King, Buddy Guy and the more modern guitarists Duke Robillard and Ronnie Earl.
He learned to play guitar from his stepfather and Blind Lemon Jefferson, who he often accompanied to gigs.

T-Bone playing an ES-5 in his own distinctive way

Walker worked around 1935 the clubs the clubs in Los Angeles’ Central Avenue and developed a reputation as a singer, guitarist, and showman. He was experimenting a lot with the electric guitar, a Gibson ES-250 and a matching EM-185 amplifier. He was good friends with Charlie Christian and both are credited with being some of the earliest guitarists to play the electric guitar.

1939 Gibson ES-250

T-Bone is most remembered with a Gibson ES-5, which he tilted against his stomach on a thin guitar strap. He turned the guitar on side to make the tones resonate more fully. With this guitar he also had the most influence on the guitarists who came after him.

1049 Gibson ES-5 with a Fender Blackface Bandmaster stack

The young Blues Boy King followed in T-Bone's footsteps with a Gibson ES-5

Goin' to Chicago - T-Bone Walker

Kirk Fletcher with a T-Bone Walker ES-5N

NANCY - Roy Buchanan

Roy Buchanan ( Ozark, Arkansas) is a legend in the music world. Buchanan was an influential artist in his style and a pioneer in the “Telecaster Sound". The guitar he used most was a Fender Telecaster with the serial number #2324 (1953), that he named, “Nancy.” He had said that he saw a man walking down the street with "Nancy" in 1969, and chased him down. He either traded a purple Telecaster or a Gibson Les Paul for her.

Roy's 1953 Blackguard Telecaster "Nancy": neck, quartersawn maple, radius 9-1/2, profile boat V and body ash

NANCY - Roy Buchanan

Nancy is a butterscotch, “Black-Guard” Tele and a bare bones "workhorse". The major difference with Buchanan and Nancy was the tone that they achieved together. Rumor has it that a mysterious pickup was the cause of the specific sound Roy could get out of his tele. Many guitar players and collectors consider a 1953 Blackguard Telecaster the Holy Grail of all Teles.

Roy's Blues - Roy Buchanan (live 1985)

Roy turned all the knobs on his Fender Twin to ten and flipped the amp so he didn't get the loud sound right in his face. With the sound from the back of the speaker, he created a sweet spot for himself. This is clearly visible in the video below. For his violin-like technique, in which he turned the volume up and down with his little finger, he needed a loud volume.

The Messiah will come again - Roy Buchanan (live 1976)

NUMBER ONE - Stevie Ray Vaughan

Stephen Ray Vaughan (Dallas, Texas) was a singer, songwriter, and record producer, best known as the guitarist and frontman of the blues rock band Double Trouble.
Stevie Ray Vaughan had several guitars but there was one he was particularly fond of, the Fender Stratocaster, which he called "number one". Stevie bought the guitar in 1973 from the Texas Music Store in Austin.

Jimmie Vaughan, Stevie Ray and Double Trouble

The strat was already well worn, allegedly being previously owned by singer-songwriter Christopher Cross. Number one has a 1962 curved rosewood neck, a 1963 alder body (two pieces) with 1959 pickups. The tremolo has been placed upside down to better reproduce Jimi Hendrix's style. The pick guard has the letters SRV and the headstock cigarette burn marks.

In 1992, Fender released a Stevie Ray Vaughan Signature Model based on Number One

Vaughan used this guitar on all 5 of his studio albums as well as the album, Family Style, with his brother Jimmie.
He preferred heavy string gauges - according to his tech Rene Martinez, he liked .013 to .060 with a wound G and always tuned down a half step (Eb-Ab-Db-Gb-Bb-Eb) to better suit his vocal range, which reduced the effective string tension to something more akin to 11s or 12s in standard tuning.

Texas flood - Stevie Ray Vaughan (live from El Mocambo)

Sources: happy bluesman, tdpri.com, Thomas Moon: The Verdict Of Big Joe Williams, weeniecampbell.com, BBC news, Talkin' to myself: Blues lyrics, Michael Taft, digitalcitizen.ca, federalcigarjugband.com, pancocojams.blogspot.nl, americanbluesscene.com, YouTube, Wikipedia, Hudson Motors Compagny, Archive Minneapolis, The Cruel Plains, M.H.Price a.o., truewestmagazine.com, The Austin Chronicle, Cambridge Free English Dictionary, Oxford Dictionary, TheSaurus.com, dragonjazz.com/grablue/blues_travel, Encyclopedia of African American Popular Culture, Blues by Paul Breman, Blues by David Harrison, Quora.com, urbandictionary.com, Blogs.loc.gov, The Ballad Hunter by Alan Lomax, Black Pearls: Blues Queens of the 1920th by Daphne Duval Harrison, jopiepopie.blogspot.nl, redhotjazz.com, The Blues Lyrics Formula by Michael Taft, American Ballads and Folk Songs by Alan Lomax and John Avery Lomax, The Past Is Not Dead: Essays from the  Southern Quarterly by Douglas B. Chambers, EarlyBlues.com, railroad-line.com,  Jason Lee Davis' RailFan Pages , centertruthjustice.org

zzxf | Iconic guitars (3)

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#3 Iconic guitars

In this column: the hoss, gibson ES-335 lefty, old lady

THE HOSS - Muddy Waters

Muddy Waters (McKinley Morganfield) was a blues singer-songwriter and important in the post-war blues scene, and is often cited as the "father of modern Chicago blues".
In 1957, Waters bought a brand new, 1958 Fender Telecaster. Originally white, with an ash body and a maple neck, he replaced the neck with rosewood in 1961, had the guitar painted candy apple red, and replaced the knobs with those from a Fender amplifier. Nicknamed “The Hoss,” this Tele was the main Muddy Waters workhorse until his death in 1983 (hoss = southern nickname for partner, a term of friendship).

Th hoss; hoss is a southern nickname for partner, a term of friendship

Waters played it on the album, Fathers and Sons, the 1969 Chess Records release which was his biggest mainstream success.
The guitar was owned by Mrs. Cameron, the widow of Muddy's manager. The manager had kept the guitar after Muddy died. In 2017 the guitar was returned to his family through the intervention of a lawyer. The guitar is now on display at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York

To the right "The Hoss"

Baby, please don't go - Muddy Waters

GIBSON ES-335 lefty - Otis Rush

Otis Rush said: "I like two guitars: Gibson semi-hollows and Fender Strats. I can go with the Gibson 345 or 355, but any of the semi-hollows do it for me. But, like with anything, there’s always something else out there. And for me, well, the Strats just can do some things and feel a bit differently than the Gibson, and sometimes I’ll trade-off".
Rush feels being left-handed is a definite advantage and points to guys like Albert King and Jimi Hendrix, who also developed signature sounds. “When you play lefty (upside down on a right-handed guitar) you’re pulling that vibrato down to the floor. That makes things a lot easier in terms of pressure and control."
Otis used a Strat for his Cobra Recording in the late 50's and in the 70's a red Gibson ES-335 (check out the album "So Many Roads").

1960s Gibson 335 Memphis dot (cherry) he played upside down
1963 Gibson ES-335TDC left handed

I can't quit you baby - Otis Rush

OLD LADY - Albert Collins

Albert Gene Drewery, aka Albert Collins, The Ice Man was an American electric blues guitarist and singer with a distinctive guitar style. He was noted for his powerful playing and his use of altered tunings and a capo. His long association with the Fender Telecaster led to the title "The Master of the Telecaster".
Collins tuned his guitar to an open F-minor chord (FCFA♭CF), with a capo at the 5th, 6th or 7th fret.

Albert Collins on stage during the Live Aid Concert at Veterans Stadium at JFK Stadium, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 13, 1984.

Albert wanted a Telecaster, but because of the cost he bought an Esquire, which he provided with a telecaster neck. This guitar he used on his earliest recordings, including his signature song, "Frosty". For the rest of his career he played a 1966s Fender Custom Telecaster with a natural ash body and maple-cap neck and a Gibson PAF humbucking pickup at the neck position. He refers to his guitar as his "Old lady".

The Fender Albert Collins Telecaster (a replica of his 1966 Custom Telecaster): featured a Seymour Duncan ’59 neck humbucker pickup, a Texas Special bridge single-coil, a natural finish ash body and a C-profile maple neck.

Ice Picking

Albert recorded his 6th album with a group of musicians, whom he called the Icebreakers. They included brothers Larry (guitar) and Aron (bass) Burton. I spoke and played with Aron when he was in the Netherlands (2000). He said Albert had taken up a banjo tuning to tune his guitar.

Aron Burton in Deventer, The Netherlands, me on the right

I ain't drunk - Albert Collins and The Icebreakers (with Debbie Davis rhythm guitar)

Sources: Thomas Moon: The Verdict Of Big Joe Williams, weeniecampbell.com, BBC news, Talkin' to myself: Blues lyrics, Michael Taft, digitalcitizen.ca, federalcigarjugband.com, pancocojams.blogspot.nl, americanbluesscene.com, YouTube, Wikipedia, Hudson Motors Compagny, Archive Minneapolis, The Cruel Plains, M.H.Price a.o., truewestmagazine.com, The Austin Chronicle, Cambridge Free English Dictionary, Oxford Dictionary, TheSaurus.com, dragonjazz.com/grablue/blues_travel, Encyclopedia of African American Popular Culture, Blues by Paul Breman, Blues by David Harrison, Quora.com, urbandictionary.com, Blogs.loc.gov, The Ballad Hunter by Alan Lomax, Black Pearls: Blues Queens of the 1920th by Daphne Duval Harrison, jopiepopie.blogspot.nl, redhotjazz.com, The Blues Lyrics Formula by Michael Taft, American Ballads and Folk Songs by Alan Lomax and John Avery Lomax, The Past Is Not Dead: Essays from the  Southern Quarterly by Douglas B. Chambers, EarlyBlues.com, railroad-line.com,  Jason Lee Davis' RailFan Pages , centertruthjustice.org

zzxa | New Blues Festival Assen – 15 okt 2021

Na een jaartje te hebben overgeslagen vindt op vrijdag 15 oktober het New Blues Festival weer plaats. Het festival wordt voor de vijfde keer georganiseerd en heeft inmiddels een mooie status verworven onder de liefhebbers van kwaliteitsmuziek. De line-up is rond en met Danny Bryant, Erwin Java’s Travel Party met Sean Webster, Wille & The Bandits en de Jose Ramirez Band staat er weer een mooi gevarieerd programma!

Het New Blues Festival Assen is een gezellig evenement waarmee we jaarlijks op zoek gaan naar een mooie selectie artiesten uit binnen- en buitenland. Een plek waar bluesliefhebbers elkaar ontmoeten in een gemoedelijke sfeer en waar je je hart op kan halen als het gaat om het (verder) ontdekken van de Blues. De line-up geeft dan ook volop ruimte om nieuwe muziek te proeven, aangevuld met acts die al wat langer meedraaien.

De Bonte Wever Assen i.s.m. AsserBluesstichting

Klik Bonte Wever voor TICKETS

De Bonte Wever Assen
Stadsbroek 17
9405 BK ASSEN

0592-356 000

zzxb | James Harman died on May 23 2021

#7 James Harman

September 2008, IJsseljazz Gorssel (NL)

Bluesman James Harman died on May 23, 2021 at the age of 74 from the effects of esophageal cancer.
Harman performed as a blues harmonica player and singer. With his Icehouse Blues Band he played alongside Big Joe Turner, John Lee Hooker, Freddie King, Muddy Waters, Albert King, B. B. King, T-Bone Walker, Lowell Fulsom, Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson, Johnny "Guitar" Watson and Albert Collins.
With his James Harman Band he lined up with Phil Alvin and Bill Bateman, Gene Taylor,and Kid Ramos and Hollywood Fats.
In 2015 the Bonetime album earned him five 2016 Blues Music Award nominations.

James was and still is a great inspiration to blues harp players and singers around the world. We are particularly grateful for his contribution to contemporary blues music and may he rest in peace.

Note: In 2008 I had the opportunity to share the stage with him during the blues and jazz festival IJsseljazz in the Netherlands.

James Harman with Greyhound Blues Band